Ingredients

  • 1/2 gallon / 4 pints milk
  • 2tsp Lemon
  • 1/2-1tsp salt
  • Herbs & spices if desired.

Note: you will need a rinsing cloth, (cheese cloth/muslin ect)

Method

  1. Heat the milk: Pour the milk into the pan and over medium heat until it simmers — just below the boil at around 200°F. Stir the milk occasionally, scraping the bottom of the pan to make sure the milk doesn’t scald.

  2. Tip Keep your eye on the pot so it doesn’t boil over. Soon as you see the tiny bubbles appear (froth) just before the boil then whip it straight off the heat.

  3. Add the lemon juice: Remove the milk from heat and stir in the lemon juice. The milk should begin to curdle immediately, but it’s ok if it doesn’t. To be honest I used Semi skimmed milk and this is harder to curdle so you may need a little more lemon juice depending on strength of the acid in it. See below.

  4. Let the milk stand: Cover the milk and let stand for 10 minutes to give the acid time to completely separate the curds and whey. At the end of 10 minutes, the curds should be completely separated and the liquid should look yellow and watery. If the milk hasn’t separated, try adding another tablespoon of acid and pop back on the heat if the milk has already cooled from the 200*f temp. If it still won’t separate, check your milk and be sure you are using non-UHT milk; this kind of milk won’t separate.

  5. Separate the curds and whey: Set a strainer or colander over a mixing bowl and line it with cheesecloth, or other straining cloth. Carefully scoop or pour the curds into the strainer, letting the whey collect in the bowl beneath.

  6. Squeeze the curds: Gather the cheesecloth in your hand and gently squeeze to remove the excess whey.

  7. Salt the curds: Open the cheesecloth and sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon of salt over the curds. Stir gently and taste. Add more salt if desired.

  8. Press the curds: Transfer the curds (still in the cheesecloth) to a large dinner plate. Shape them into a rough round or square block and then fold the cheesecloth tightly around the curds to form a neat package. Set a second plate on top of the package and weigh it down. Press for at least 15 minutes or up to 1 hour.

  9. Use or refrigerate the paneer: Once pressed, your paneer is finished and ready to use. You can use it immediately or refrigerate for up to two days. Refrigerated paneer will be firmer and less likely to crumble than fresh paneer.

RECIPE NOTES

Whole vs. 2% vs. Non-Fat Milk: While whole milk is our favorite for making ricotta, 2% milk can also be used, though the ricotta is slightly less rich and creamy. Avoid using skim and nonfat milks; these don’t separate as easily into curds and whey.

Pasteurized Milk: Pasteurized milk is fine to use for making ricotta, but avoid UHT (Ultra High Temperature) pasteurized milk as this process changes the protein structure of the milk, preventing it from separating.

Let me know if you try this!

Published by Wife of a Turkish Life

Just a normal lass living in a beautiful city in the uk and soon to move over to Turkey. I have 3 beautiful children and a lovely Kurdish hubby from turkey. We currently live apart from our Turkish family in turkey and live in the Uk and soon to move back over to turkey for good. I love everything about my life! I absolutely adore cooking and baking, I cook a beautiful meal and dessert every night and light lunch during the day if we are hungry. I bake a lot too hence why I’m growing to the size of an elephant and find it hard to shed the lbs (ooops) I also love, shopping, socialising, date night together with the hubby when he’s home, I love make up and being and hairdresser and beautiful among others things I love everything about self presentation. At the moment I am a fully mummy to two little beauties and I love it. Please feel free to follow my blog and have a little onsite into our life. I’m just starting out so there’s much more to be added each day. Please be kind and if You don’t like my life then don’t feel the need to stick around and tell me in a nasty comment 😝.

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